100K in 10 Days

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Running is exhilarating in every sense of the word. Part of the excitement is the physical challenge and sensation of feet pounding the concrete. Then there’s the feeling of sucking in fresh air, sweating and feeling a chill at the same time, fast heart beats and traveling freely at speed. But one of the most fantastic parts of running is the moments you experience when the world is waking up or going to sleep. Seeing the sun rise before everyone else has awoken. Seeing the grass still frozen as the planet warms up. Views of untouched snow and the sound of morning bird song. A road with no traffic or a lone plane in a cloudless sky. There’s something striking and powerful about experiencing these moments on a run.

When you become ill or someone in your life becomes ill, you suddenly realise how beautiful the world is. You look back at all the moments you took for granted. And all the things that seemed so important at the time, now seem so insignificant. You capture every possible moment of beauty that you can, from sunrise to sunset. Life is so fast, so full of stress and so burdened with unnecessary pressures. It is only when you slow down and make a conscious effort to really look and see what is around you, that you realise the extent to which life is filled with special people, special things and special moments. It is sad that it takes hardship or illness to make us stop and appreciate these moments, but it’s during the tough times that we feel gratitude the most.

When a friend approached me and asked me to run 100K in 10 days, I did not hesitate to say ‘Yes.’ He informed me that the mother of a girl I went to university with had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Rather than accepting the rubbish options the NHS offered her, she chose to undergo an experimental treatment involving lots of nutrient-dense supplementation and juicing. And it’s improving her quality of life dramatically. Being someone who is deeply passionate about holistic health and nutrition, I felt really strongly about Julie’s journey. It’s so promising to see a few select medical professionals embracing nutrition as a healing mechanism. We live on a planet that heals itself, the animals and plants that inhabit it. Why not use the planet to heal ourselves?

When Euan, Sam and I first started our 100K in 10 days, we felt great. The first couple of 10Ks were easy and enjoyable. But personally, my joints were on fire by day 3 or 4. On day five, I could only manage 5K due to a very intense day/week at work. I lacked energy and I lacked time. This meant I had to make up these kilometres at the weekend, which meant two 12K runs in a row. By this point, I was popping ibuprofen just to get through and my body felt extremely inflamed. On the final day, it was just about finishing without stopping or quitting. After ten days of non-stop running, we had done it. Ticked the box. Achieved. Off the bucket list. And we were already planning what we would do next! Every time my mind told me to quit, I pushed through. I told myself that my pain was insignificant and that I was stronger than I gave myself credit for. My ankles were crying, but they got their rest when all was done.

This running challenge was so much fun, because I was part of a team. The team effort was greatly motivating and we could track each other’s progress using Strava and Instagram. I made sure to take probiotics every night to help regulate my sleep and energy. My diet consisted of a lot of vegan protein, turkey, veggies, avocado, apples and bananas. Oh and of course, the odd bit of chocolate-covered nuts (#addict). Challenge yourself. And if you do, do it for a good cause. Please check out Julie’s story here and if you can, donate a couple of quid. It’s a giving time of year after all! Thanks for reading and if you do 100K in 10 days, please do share your experience with me here.

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